Reading, Writing, and Spelling Crafts and Activities

Spelling Games Learn to Read Games Writing Games
Learn to Spell Helps Learn to Read Helps Writing Activities
Word Card Games Reading Crafts and Activities ABC Games

Bulletin Board and
Word Wall Printables
   

 

Word Wall Printables

Word Wall Printables Pictures for Bulletin Board Displays www.daniellesplace.com

Use these charming printables to encourage your children to learn and spell new words. Print out the patterns onto card stock and staple them to a bulletin board. Make word cards by cutting different colors of construction paper in half lengthwise and then into 2-inch strips. These printable bulletin board pictures are available to members. You can also glue the pictures to the outside of a file folder and store the word cards in the pockets. Or glue them to a large envelope and store the words inside the envelope.

Words I Otter Know

Words I Otter Know www.daniellesplace.comIf your child is learning to read, print any new words he doesn't know on the word cards. Pin the new words under the "Words I Otter Know" otter picture.

When your child is done reading go over the new words, and then ask you child if he recognizes any of the words. If your child knows any of the words, let him take the word cards down and pin them under the "Words I Bear-ly Know".

If you are using spelling words, remove all the spelling words from the board and go over them a couple of times, and then have your child spell the words on his own. If he spells a word correctly the first time without any help, pin the word card under the "Words I Bear-ly Know" bear picture. If he doesn't spell the word correctly the first time, go over the word again, but pin it back under the otter picture.

The next day follow the same process with the word cards under this picture.

©2012, Digital by Design, Inc. -This activity and the word phrases are copyrighted, including any derivative work (A derivative work is a new, original product that includes aspects of a preexisting, already copyrighted work.) - See Copyright Regulations for this web site.

Words I Bear-ly Know

Words I bearly know Printable sheet www.daniellesplace.comThe words under this category are words your child has already studied or recognized correctly at least once. They should be reviewed every day until your child can spell or read them.

If you are practicing spelling, remove all the words that are pinned under the bear. Ask your child to spell the words. If he can spell the word on the first try, let him pin it under the "Words, I Owl-most Know" owl picture. If he can't spell a word, go over the word and then place it back under the "Words I Bear-ly Know" picture.

If you are practicing word recognition, leave the words under the bear picture and ask your child if he recognizes any of the words. If he can say any of the words the first time, let him take the words down and pin them under the "Words I Owl-most Know" owl picture. If he doesn't recognize a word, go over the word again, but leave it pinned under the "Words I Bear-ly Know" picture to be reviewed the next day.

Words I Owl-most Know

Words I Owl-most Know printable spelling help sheet www.daniellesplace.comThe words under this category are words your child has already recognized or spelled correctly at least twice. They should be reviewed every day until your child can spell or read them.

If you are practicing spelling, remove all the words that are pinned under the owl. Ask your child to spell the words. If he can spell the word on the first try, let him pin it under the "Words, I Know Purr-fectly" cat picture. If he can't spell a word, go over the word again and then place it back under the "Words I Owl-most Know" owl picture.

If you are practicing word recognition, ask your child if he recognizes any of the words under the owl picture. If he can say any of the words without help, let him take the words down and pin them under the "Words I Know Purr-fectly" cat picture. If he doesn't recognize a word, go over the word again, but leave the word pinned under the "Words I Owl-most Know" picture to be reviewed the next day.

Words I Know Purr-fectly

Words I Know Purr-fectly www.daniellesplace.comThe words under this category are words your child has already recognized or spelled correctly at least three times. They should be reviewed at least every week until you know your child will not forget them. If you have a lot of words under this category, you can start taking the easier words off and only display recent words.

©2012, Digital by Design, Inc. -This activity and the word phrases are copyrighted, including any derivative work (A derivative work is a new, original product that includes aspects of a preexisting, already copyrighted work.) - See Copyright Regulations for this web site.

 

Spelling Games

 

Spelling Dominoes

spelling dominoesPlay dominoes and review beginning and ending sounds. Beginning sounds used in this game are: b, fl, ch, h, s, sh t, w, g, it, an, op ar. Ending sounds used are: op, in, am, um ap ash, ill, en at, it, an, ch, and ar.

Print out the domino patterns:

Pattern 1 (PDF Pattern)
Pattern 2 (PDF Pattern)
Pattern 3 (PDF Pattern) (Printing Problems?)

Turn all the dominoes cards over on the table. Each player picks seven cards. Place one card in the middle of the table. Take turns trying to match up the dominoes to spell out words. Some of the dominoes have the same letters or letter sounds on both sides of the dominoes. Use these dominoes to start new paths going in different directions. The "it", "an", "op" and "ar" dominoes can be used as either ending or beginning sounds. The first player to use up all his cards wins. If no one uses up all his cards, the player with the least amount of cards wins. If you can't play a card on your turn, you must pick up one card. You can try to play the card you picked up on that turn. When placing dominoes the letters must be able to match up so that they are both facing the same direction except when using the dominoes that are used to make new paths.

Words that can be used in this game:
bop, flop, chop, hop, top, bin, chin, sin, tin, gin, flam, ham, Sam, bum chum, hap, sap, tap, gap, flap, chap, hap, sap, tap, gap, bash, flash, hash, sash, gash, bill, chill, hill, sill, till, gill, ben, hen, ten, bat, flat, chat, hat, sat, tat, itch, its, ant, open, art, and arch.

©2004 - Digital by Design, Inc. - See Copyright Information

 

Duck, Duck, Goose Spelling Game

This game is played like Duck, Duck, Goose except children spell out a word. The child walks around the circle tapping a child's head for each letter of the word. On the last letter he runs around the circle while the child that was tapped last chases him. If the child spelled the word wrong, or if the child chasing him tagged him, he has to do it again.


What Letter is Missing?

Write a spelling word on pieces of paper one letter per paper. Place the letters in order and show your child the word. Tell him to close his eyes while you remove one letter. Mix up the papers. Now tell your child to put the letters back in order to spell out the word and then tell you which letter is missing. (You can use letters from a Scrabble game or letter blocks instead or cutting up pieces of paper.)


Play Hangman

Play Hangman except use only your child's spelling words. If you don't like the idea of a hangman, make up a different character.


Spelling Review with a Puppet

You will need a puppet that can open and close its mouth for this review game. Tell your child that the puppet is very hungry. Give your child some small sheets of paper and tell him that the paper is the puppet's food, but the puppet only likes to eat food that has words on it and only words that are spelled correctly. Give your child a spelling word and tell him to write it on the piece of paper and then try to feed it to the puppet. If the word is spelled correctly, make the puppet eat it up and make happy sounds. If the word is spelled incorrectly, make the puppet start to chew on it but then spit it out and choke on it. Tell your child that the puppet didn't like it because he didn't spell the word correctly. Let him try again until he spells it right.

 

Learn to Spell Helps

 

Learn American Sign Language and Spelling at the Same Time

This is a great way to review spelling words. Teach your child the signs for each of the letters. You can find information and printouts for each letter on many web sites. Once you both know the letters, you can take turns spelling words to each other and seeing if you can guess what the other person is spelling.

Make up your own sign language - This is a great way to review and get the wiggles out at the same time. Help your child come up with different ways he can make each letter of the alphabet using his whole body then give him a word to spell using his body.

 


Word Search

Make your own spelling word search - At Discoveryschool.com web site you can type in your child's spelling words and make a personalized word search.

 

 

Learn to Read Game

 

Easter Bunny Egg Scramble Game

Easter Bunny Egg Scramble Printable Game - Review vocabulary words with this fun interactive game.  Now available as an instant download from www.daniellesplace.com for only $1.00!Children scramble to collect the most eggs.

What you will need: Card stock (heavy paper), die, markers, scissors, a marker or playing piece for each player, and tape.

How to Make Easter Bunny Egg Scramble Game:

1. Print out the game patterns onto card stock. (Available to members only) and tape them together to make the game board.

2. Print out the egg patterns onto different colors of card stock or use white card stock and color the eggs. (Available to members only) Cut out the eggs.

These patterns are also available as an instant download for non-members.

Game Board and Eggs Pattern - $1.00 -   

Set Up:

1. Print your child's vocabulary words or words he is learning to read on the eggs. You can also use math facts, review questions from your lessons, and spelling words. If you are using spelling words, turn the cards over so that your child cannot see the words.

2. Place the eggs on top of the pictures of the eggs on the board. You can place more than one egg on each picture.

How to Play:

1. To start players place their markers on top of any of the eggs on the board.

2. Each player should throw the die to see who has the highest number. The player with the highest number goes first.

3. The first player throws the die and moves that many spaces in either direction (clockwise or counter clockwise). If there is an egg or more than one egg on the space he lands on, he gets to collect one egg after saying the vocabulary word, answering the math fact, or spelling the word correctly. If a player does not answer correctly, he does not get to keep the egg. Keep playing like this until all the eggs on the board have been collected. The child with the most eggs wins.

©2010, Digital by Design - See Copyright Information

 

Compound Words Scrambled Eggs Game

Unscramble the Eggs to Make Compound Words!

Compound Words Scrambled Eggs Game www.daniellesplace.comThis is a fun and challenging game that reinforces the fact that two words put together can make completely new words.

What you will need: Card stock (Heavy paper) or pretty scrap booking paper, marker, and. scissors.

How to Make Scrambled Eggs Game: Cut egg shapes from the paper and write words on the eggs that when put together will make a new compound word.

To Play: Give each child a set of cards and see who can "unscramble" the eggs first.

Three different sets of nine compound words and a Fill-in-the-words sheet are Available to Members.

This pattern is also available as an instant download for $1.00

  

Foods - buttercup, sweetheart, butternut, cheesecake, tablespoon, shortbread, gumball, jellyfish, and egghead.

Body - bodyguard, sideburns, handbook, headline, footrest, brainwash, eyelash, backslide, and skintight.

Animals - watchdog, grasshopper, bluefish, butterflies, horseback, honeybee, earthworm, snakeskin, and blackbird.

©2010, Digital by Design - See Copyright Information

 

"What Can It Be?" Reading Game

Reading GameThis is a great way to review vocabulary words that your child is having trouble remembering.

What you will need: Construction paper, pictures from coloring books, magazines, calendars, etc.

How to Make "What Can It Be" Reading Game: Mark off lines one inch apart on a piece of construction paper as shown in the picture. Print one of your child's vocabulary words above each line. Cut on the lines leaving one inch from the side of the paper intact. Glue a picture on another piece of construction paper, any size will do, even a very small picture. Then staple the word page on top of the picture page. Staple the left-hand side that hasn't been cut so that you can lift up the word strips to see what is under them.

Ask your child to pick any word on the page and tell you what it says. If he can tell you what the word is, lift the flap to reveal part of the picture underneath. If he doesn't guess correctly, he should pick another word to read. Keep playing until he has discovered what the picture is.

How to Print or Copy these Instructions.

©2000, Digital by Design - See Copyright Information

 

Feed The Dogs Reading Folder Game

Feed the dog reading folder gameThis game can be used with children at all levels. Word endings are written on the dog bowls and beginning sounds are on pieces of dog food (square pieces of paper). Your child must place the dog food into the correct bowl to spell a word. Each dog must end up with only three pieces of food.

The patterns for this game are available to members only. (Just click on the link.) It includes six games with different word endings: at, it, og, ot, ig, ed, ut, in, an, ar, un, ap, ake, ace, ice, and oke. (This activity is available to Members Only.)

©2000, Digital by Design - See Copyright Information

 

"Is It a Word?" Learn to Read Game

is it a word learn to read gameCut up two different colors of card stock into 2" pieces to make cards. On one set of cards write words endings and on the other set write beginning sounds. Fold down the tops of two paper bags as shown in the picture. Write "Ending sounds" and Beginning Sounds" on the bags matching the colors you used for the cards. Write the title of the game, "Is it a Word?" on the bags as shown in the picture. Place the cards in the appropriate bags.

How to Play:

1. The first player selects one card from each bag and puts the letters together to see if they spell a word. If the letters spell a word, the player gets a point. The player then places the cards back in the bag and shakes it up again for the next player. The first player to reach ten points first wins.

"Is It a Word?" Game 1:

Words ending in ail, ew, ead, ake, ide, ade, ask, ike, ead, op, out, ill, ain, ue, ank, ug, ail, amp, ing, all, and ink.

Beginning sound cards (PDF Pattern)
Ending sound cards (PDF Pattern) (Printing Problems?)

"Is It a Word?" Game 2:

Words ending in eel, eal, eet, eat, eed, ead, eep, and eap.

Beginning sounds (PDF Pattern)
Ending sounds (PDF Pattern)
Directions (PDF Pattern) (Printing Problems?)

eep, and eap.

How to Print or Copy these Instructions.

©2000, Digital by Design - See Copyright Information

 

 

Flat Cat Learn to Read Game and Craft

flat cat craftUse this cute little cat to play a word game that teaches your children words that rhyme with "cat". Children will love making their own flat cats to take home and help them learn to read.

What you will need: Two or three Styrofoam dinner plates or heavy duty paper plate for each cat, one small paper plate, acrylic paint, glue or staples, large paper clip, and sticky note paper or plain paper.

How to Make Flat Cat Learn to Read Game and Craft:

1. Cut out legs, ears, and a tail from one paper plate or a Styrofoam tray. I cut the feet from around the rim of the paper plate so that they naturally bend down. Try not to have the feet and tail stick out too far. This makes it harder to spin because the tail and legs keep bumping on things.

2. Glue or staple the legs and tail to the top of one plate.

3. Cover that paper plate with another paper plate to form the cat's body. The plates should be glued or stapled top to top.

4. Fold the small plate in half to form the cat's head. Glue ears to the head at the fold. Glue the head to the body.

5. Paint the cat.

6. Write words that rhyme cat such as rat, mat, sat, flat, fat, bat, hat, pat, rat, tat, at, and vat on sticky note paper or just small pieces of paper. Place the stack of words in the cat's mouth. Secure the words with a large paper clip or clothespin.

7. To play have the children sit in a circle around the cat. Take a hold of two of the cat's legs and spin the cat. (Practice this before class) The child that is in line with the cat's head picks a word card and reads it. Keep going until all the words have been read.

How to Print or Copy these Instructions.

©2000, Digital by Design - See Copyright Information

 

Rainy Day Words Cloud Craft

cloud gameChildren assemble the cloud and rainbow craft. They think of words that describe a rainy day and write them on the raindrops. They can then make a cloud shaped book and write a rainy day story using the new words they have learned.

What you will need: Paper, crayons, scissors, and glue.

How to make:

  1. Print out the pattern for the rainbow (PDF Pattern) and front cloud (PDF Pattern) and the back cloud. Have the children cut them out. (Printing Problems?)
  2. Color the rainbow.
  3. Glue the small cloud to the bottom half of the large cloud matching up the sides and bottom. Glue around the edge to form an envelope.
  4. Glue the rainbow to the back of the large cloud as pictured above.
  5. Use the raindrop pattern to cut raindrops shapes from blue paper or just color the raindrops.
  6. Have your children think of words that would describe a rainy day and write them on the raindrops and then place them in the cloud envelope.
  7. Use the large cloud pattern to make a cloud shaped book. Write a story using the new words in the cloud shaped book.
©2004 - Digital by Design, Inc. - See Copyright Information


Label Mommy Game

Here's another fun activity to help your child learn to read.

label mommyWhat you will need: sticky notepapers, or small pieces of paper and tape, and marker.

How to Make Label Mommy Game:

1. Before you start tell your children that they need to pay attention really well because every word that they remember they will get to stick on you, but every word they forget, you get to stick on them.

2. Help your children think of words that are body parts such as eyes, ear, nose, forehead, cheek, hand, feet, chin, lip, mouth, etc. Go over each word and write them on a separate piece of paper.

3. Mix up the words and set them out on the table. Have your children take turns picking a word and trying to figure out what it is. If a child figures out what they word is he picked, he can stick it on the body part that is written on the paper. If not, you get to stick it on him.

How to Print or Copy these Instructions.

©2000, Digital by Design - See Copyright Information

 

Twister Review Game

This is a great way to teach children who can't sit still for very long. Use a dry erase marker to write numbers, letters, or vocabulary words on the circles. Write the same numbers, letters, or words on the spinner. Play just like twister except call out the words instead of the colors.

 

Compound Words

Compound words are two words together that make one words such as ladybug. There are many other insects that have names that are compound words. Ask your child if he can think of any. Play the following game with your child.

 

Compound Word Bugs Game

Write the following words on cards: Lady, fire, yellow, walking, June, grass, bumble, wolf, cut, ear, swallow, butter. Write these words on a different color of cards: Bug, fly, jacket, stick, bug, hopper, bee, spider, worm, wig, tail, fly. (A Pattern is available to members on The Resource Room. )

Mix the cards up and place one color on one side of the table and the other color on the other side of the table. Have your child try to match up a card from one side to a card from the other side to make compound words. Once your child knows which words go together play a concentration game. Turn all the cards over and take turns turning two cards over at a time. If they match, the player gets to keep them. The player who gets the most cards wins.

 

Draw Compound Bugs

Use the cards from the Compound Word Bug Game above. Mix up the cards and have your children pick two cards from each color group. Have them put them together to make a new type of bug, and draw a picture of the new type of bug.

 

Frog Learn to Read Game - Musical Lily Pads

Cut out lily pad shapes from construction paper. Write your children's vocabulary words on the lily pads, one per lily pad. Tape them to the floor in a circle just far enough apart so that your children have to leap to reach the next lily pad. Play like musical chair except no one has to sit down. As you play some music have the children leap from one lily pad to the next. When the music stops each child reads the word on his lily pad.

 

Feed the Kitty Word Sounds Game

Cat Paper Plate Craft for Kids from www.daniellesplace.comThis cute little kitty will help your child learn to read in a fun and active way.

What you will need: Two paper plates, card stock, glue, and scissors.

How to Make Feed the Kitty Word Sounds Game:

1. Print out the patterns for the eyes, nose, arms, and tongue (PDF Pattern) and cut them out. Color the nose and tongue pink.

2. Print out the cat face pattern (PDF Pattern) and use it as a template to cut a paper plate to make the cats face. Use the the pattern to cut just the ear shapes out of another paper plate for the back of the head. Glue the two paper plates together (top to top) to make the face.

3. Glue on the nose and eyes. Draw in the whiskers with a black marker. Color in the ears. Glue the arms on the back of the head as shown in the picture.

4. Cut a slit in the paper plate used for the back of the head 2 1/2" long and 1/4" wide. Slip the tongue down through the hole so that it stick out of the mouth.

The Kitty can be used to teach and review many subjects.

How to Print or Copy these Instructions.

©2000, Digital by Design - See Copyright Information

Review Letter Sounds - Print out small pictures of different items and place a piece of tape on the back of each one. Using pictures from your child's worksheets works great. Tell your child that the kitty is very hungry but she only wants to eat things that start with the "a" sound. (Move the kitty's tongue back and forth.) Ask your child if he or she can find a picture of something that starts with that sound and place it on the kitty's tongue. If the child is correct, the kitty will eat it. (Pull up the tongue so it looks like the kitty is eating it. And pull it all the way out and remove the picture. Then place the tongue back in it's mouth. If the child picked a picture that does not match that letter sound, just move the tongue back and forth and tell your child that the kitty does not like that one because it doesn't start with that sound, and he should try again. (You can also play this game using ending sounds and long or short vowel sounds.)

Review words - Play as above only use word cards with matching pictures. Show your child a word card and have him feed the kitty a picture that matches the word.

Review Numbers or Letters - Give your child a pad of small sticky notes. Tell him that the kitty is hungry for a certain letter or number. He should write the letter or number on the sticky note and feed it to the kitty. If he is correct, the kitty eats it. If not, he must try again.

Spelling Words - Play as above only have your child write his or her spelling words on sticky notes. If he or she spells them correctly, the kitty will eat them, if not, he must try again.

 

Learn to Read Helps

 

Reading with a Puppet

Doug sock puppet Ford focus spokespuppet www.daniellesplace.comIs your child hving a hard time sitting still and concentrating when you are teaching him to read? Here is a great technique to use that will take a lot of the frustration out process.

Children love to feel like they are in control and this technique will give them a little control. When you are having a hard time getting your child settled down enough to read bring out a puppet that says he knows how to read. Make the puppet sound like he is bragging. Say something like, "I can read 100 words a minute! I can read the whole dictionary. Do you want to hear me read?" Of course your child would prefer the puppet to read than himself even if the puppet is better than him. Once the puppet starts to read, have him get stuck on some easy words or say the wrong words and read the sentences so they don't make sense. Your child will then try to help him. If he doesn't volunteer his help, have the puppet ask him for help. The puppet can then say, "Wow, you're a pretty good reader!" This will give your child confidence in his reading. When my child was trying to help the puppet read and didn't know a word, she would whisper to me and ask what the word was and then tell the puppet. It was a lot of fun and she was reading!

 

Dial-a-Word Wheel

Reading WheelChildren turn the inside wheel to make words that rhyme with "at" and form new words. Each new word is represented by a picture below the word.

What you will need: Card stock, crayons or markers, scissors, and brad.

How to Make Dial-a-Word Wheel:

1. Print out the patterns:

Word Wheel 1 - Cat - Top Wheel (PDF Pattern) and Bottom Wheel (PDF Pattern)
Word Wheel 2 - Can - Top Wheel (PDF Pattern) and Bottom Wheel (PDF Pattern)
Word Wheel 3 - Rib - Top Wheel (PDF Pattern) and Bottom Wheel (PDF Pattern)
Word Wheel 4 - Pin - Top Wheel (PDF Pattern) and Bottom Wheel (PDF Pattern)
Word Wheel 5 - Tub - Top Wheel (PDF Pattern) and Bottom Wheel (PDF Pattern)

2. Cut out the wheels. Cut out the square at the top of the wheel. Cut out the window at the bottom leaving the top attached to form a flap to cover the window.

3. Punch a whole through the center of both wheels and put a brad in the center so that the wheels turn.

4. Have your child color the picture.

5. The child turns the wheel to find a new letter, sounds out the word to figure out what the new word spells. When he thinks he knows what the word is, he opens the flap to see if the picture matches the word he guessed.

How to Print or Copy these Instructions.

©2000, Digital by Design - See Copyright Information

 

Spelling and Vocabulary Word Games

 

Match Game

Use the word cards to play match game. Write your child's vocabulary words on index cards. Make two cards for each word. Place all the cards face down on a table. Take turns turning over two cards at a time trying to find matching cards. If they match, the player gets to keep the cards and try again until he misses. The player that has the most cards at the end of the game wins.

 

What's the Word?

Write all your child's spelling words or vocabulary words on index cards. Show your child a card and ask him what the word is. If e knows the word, he gets a penny or other reward. (If you are using spelling words, ask him to spell the word without showing him the card). If he knows the word or can spell it, take it out of the cards in your hand and place it on the table face up. If he doesn't know the word or can't spell it, tell him what it is or how to spell it and then place it in the back of the cards in your hand. Keep playing until all the cards are on the table.

 

Timed Review

Use a certain amount of cards and time your child to see how fast they can say all the words. See if they can beat their time.

 

Find the Special Card Vocabulary Review Game

Place a sticker on the back of one of the word cards. Place all the word cards on the table face up. Have your child select a card and tell you what it says. If she says the word correctly, she gets to turn it over to see if there is a sticker on it. If she doesn't know the word, help her pronounce it and then let her turn over the card to see if there is a sticker on it. Keep playing until your child finds the card with the sticker. You can give her a small reward for finding the card with the sticker. Place the sticker on another card and play again. Keep playing until your child gets bored.

 

Find the Missing Part Vocabulary or Spelling Review

Write your child's spelling or vocabulary words on index cards; but write half of each word on one card and the other half on another card. Write the first half of the words on yellow cards and the second half of the words on green cards so that your child knows to match up the cards with a yellow first and then a green. Spread the cards out on a table face up. Ask your child to match up the cards to make words. You can time her the first time and then have her do it again to try to beat her first time. Keep playing until your child can match up all the cards quickly.

 

Find a Word

You will need old children's magazines. Open up two magazines to pages with about the same amount of words on them. Take turns picking a word to look for. Each person looks for that word on their page and circles all the ones they find. The person who finds the most on their page wins.

 

Find Letter Blends, or Endings

Pick a common word blend such as tr, pr, th etc. Tell your child that every time she finds that blend in the book she is reading she will get a reward. Or if she can find a certain number of words with that word blend she will get a prize. This is a great way to help them learn how to spell.

 

Reading Crafts and Activities

 

 

Friday Fun Day Treasure Hunt

Treasure hunts are a great way to reinforce reading, math, and thinking skills. Your child will be motivated to read and figure out problems because he will be anxious to find the treasure at the end of his hunt. You can design your treasure hunt to match your child's skills. In our home school, Fridays are fun days. We play review games and take field trips relating to what we are studying, etc. Treasure hunts are great because you can review all the materials you have covered that week.

View a sample treasure hunt - Page 1 and Page 2

I used a box or candy corn as the treasure for this hunt. This treasure hunt was written for a fourth grader.

 

Learning Vowel Sounds Song

I Had a Vowel
Written by Narita Roady
(Sing to the tune of "Bingo")

Sing Using the Short Vowel Sounds.

I had my vowels to make some words
And this is how they sound
A - e - i - o -u
A - e - i - o -u
A - e - i - o -u
And that is how they sound

I had an 'A' to make some words
And this is what I made
Cat, hat, bat, and rat
Cat, hat, bat, and rat
Cat, hat, bat, and rat
And this is what I made

E - Set, bet, get, and jet

I - Sit, bit, hit, and fit

O - Cot, dot, got, and rot

U - Cut, hut, nut, and rut

Sing Using Long Vowel Sounds.

I had my vowels to make some words
And this is how they sound
A - e - i - o -u
A - e - i - o -u
A - e - i - o -u
And that is how they sound

I had an 'A' to make some words
And this is what I made
Ate, cape, hate, and mate
Ate, cape, hate, and mate
Ate, cape, hate, and mate
And this is what I made

E - Tea, see, weed, and keep

I - Bite, like, kite, and ripe

O - Note, hope, rope, and joke

U - Cube, rude, tube, and tune

©2000, Digital by Design - See Copyright Information

 

Writing Games

 

Play "Don't Complete the Sentence"

Players take turns writing a word and adding to the previous words to make a sentence. The player who completes the sentence looses. Each player must have a sentence in mind when he adds his word. If a player can't think of a word to add to the sentence, the other player must finish the sentence. If he can finish the sentence, he wins. Younger children will like this game if you just write silly sentences and don't worry about who finishes the sentence.

 

Write a Silly Story

Each person takes a turn adding one sentence to the story until it is finished.

 

Writing Activities

 

Preposition Easter Egg Hunt, Writing Activity, and Bulletin Board Display

Preposition Easter Egg Hunt, Writing Activity, and Bulletin Board Display www.daniellesplace.com

 

Use this Easter display to review prepositions, vocabulary words, or for other learning activities.

Printable Patterns for this craft are available to members.

Also available as an instant download to non-members for $2.00 including: Bunny pattern, preposition basket lables, and egg shapes.

    

What you will need:

Regular-sized Paper Plates, White Card Stock, White Pipe Cleaners, Paint, Scissors, Feather Boa or Feathers, and Glue

What to do:

1. To make the head fold down two sides of a paper plate about one inch wide and six inches long. Fold another paper plate the same way. Cut the mouth shape out of one of the paper plates. (Pattern available to members.)

2. Draw a face on the plate and poke small holes for the whiskers. Cut pipe cleaners in half and stick them in the holes. Tape them to the back of the plate. (Patterns for the eyes, nose, and mouth are available to members.)

3. Glue the two head paper plates together to make the head and glue it to the top of another paper plate.

4. Cut feet shapes, arms, and ears shapes from other paper plates and glue them to the body. (Patterns are available to members.)

5. Paint the ears, mouth, paws, and belly.

6. To finish glue part of a feather boa or feathers to the top of the head.

7. To make the baskets fold a paper plate in half and cut out half the center of a paper plate. Cut another paper plate in half and glue it to the front of the cut paper plate to make a basket. Paint the basket. Write "Prepositions" on one plate and "Objects of Prepositions" on the other, or use the printable pattern. (Available to members.)

Preposition Easter Egg Review Game

1. Print out egg shapes onto different colors of paper, and some on white paper. (A pattern for the eggs is available to members.)

2. Write prepositions on the colored eggs such as under, on, in, below, above, etc. Hide the eggs according to what you wrote on the eggs. If you wrote the word "under", hide the egg under something. Write objects of the prepositions on another set of eggs (the places where you hid the eggs) and tape themto the bulletin board.

3. Have each child find one egg and then write a sentence saying where they found the egg on a white egg such as: "I found the egg under the table." Then have them decorate the egg. Tape the finished eggs on the bulletin board.

©2012, Digital by Design - See Copyright Information

 

Action Verbs Color Sheet

Action Verb Color Sheet www.daniellesplace.com

Action verbs are words that tell us what a person or thing can do.

How to Use this Sheet:

1. Have your children color the activity sheet and then make their own sheet using different action verbs.

2. Have yoru children color the activity sheet and then write sentences using each action word on the sheet.

This printable sheet is available to members.

©2012, Digital by Design - See Copyright Information

 

Write it Down!

Do you have problems getting your child to concentrate on his schoolwork? Does he keep coming up with questions and changing the subject? Here's a solution that will keep him focused or at least help him with his spelling and writing. Make it a rule that during school your child cannot ask a question that doesn't pertain to his lesson or change the subject unless he writes the question down so you can read it. For example, he might write, "Can I have a snack?" You would answer him by writing something such as, "You can have a snack when you finish your math." When he is finished he might write, "Can I have a snack now?" You can then write, "What would you like for a snack?" Make the words appropriate for your child's reading level.

If your child has a question that doesn't pertain to the lesson, such as "How do they make pencils?" Have your child write it down and tell him that we will set this question aside until we are done with the lesson and then we will try to find the answer. This will work great with children with ADD because they can then get their attention back to the lesson knowing that their question will be answered later.

This also works great when you are on the telephone. Your child won't have to interrupt you and he won't forget the question because it is written down. Don't worry about his spelling when you are doing this activity. Just keep track of the words he is misspelling and add them to his spelling list.

 

"Duck on a Bike"

Written by David Shannon (Ages 3 - 7) - One day down on the farm a goofy looking duck decides to ride a bike. He says hello as to all the different animals that that live on the farm as he rides by. They all say hi back in their won way, but what there really thinking is something completely different. Cat says, "Meow, but what she thought was, "I wouldn't waste my time riding a bike." She is seen lying on the ground licking her paw like she could care less. Horse says, "Ne-e-e-igh!". But what he thought was, "You're still not as fast as me, Duck!" He is pictured with his nose up in the air and glancing sideways at duck. Goat say, "M-a-a-a". But what he thought was, "I'd like to eat that bike!" He is shown with wide eyes staring at the bikes tires.

Creative Writing

This is a great book to demonstrate repetition in writing. Your children can write their own pages to add to the story. Let them pick an animal and decide what he thought after saying hello to Duck. If you have beginning writers have them use the fill in the blank worksheet. More experienced writers can follow the pattern used in the book. They can then draw a picture illustrating their own page. Here is an example my daughter wrote. "Then Duck rode, no-hands, past armadillo. "Hello, Armadillo," said Duck. "Hello," said Armadillo. But what he thought was "He needs a helmet like me." Art - This is a great book to demonstrate perspective in drawing. We see the duck on a bike drawn from every perspective imaginable.

For more activities relating to Children's books go to the Activities and Crafts for Popular Children's Books Page for Members Only.

 

ABC, I Believe Lessons for home School

Start your home school day right with this fun and engaging Bible study
curriculum for preschool through third grade.

1. Each lesson in this curriculum is a thematic unit based on a letter of the alphabet, an animal starting with that letter, and a basic Bible truth.

2. Each thematic unit in this curriculum is used for one week reinforcing the main Bible truth and integrating it into every study area through games and activities. Areas include: math, reading, writing, science, physical fitness, and more.

3. The Bible lessons and activities in this curriculum are great for children who have special needs, such as children with ADD, ADHD, or other learning disabilities because all areas of study are reinforced using active learning and lots of sensory stimulation. Children learn while having fun!

4. The lessons and activities in this curriculum were designed for children preschool through third grade. You can use the same lesson for all these levels. The games and activities are made so you can adapt them to your child's needs and academic level.

To find out more about the ABC, I Believe Lessons AND receive the first four lessons for free go to the ABC, I Believe Home Page.

 

Affiliate Disclaimer

Learn to draw cartoons the fun way! Learn to draw cartoons the fun way!

The Resource Room - Hundreds of Bible Lessons, Bible Crafts, and Bible Games on www.daniellesplace.com

Sunday School Crafts

ABC, I Believe Bible Lessons from www.daniellesplace.com

 

Puppet Ministry Set

Puppet Ministry Set

 

ABC with Noah

 

Get Ready for the Code - Book a

Get Ready for the Code - Book A

For very beginning readers.

 

Explode the Code 1

Explode the Code 1

These workbooks are great for
teaching children to read. They are
easy to use and effective.

 

Learning Fun with Crafts
and Activities

Crafts for Kids from www.daniellesplace.com

Word Nerds: Teaching All Students to
Learn and Love Vocabulary

 

Spelling Power

Spelling Power

This famous, award-winning spelling
program teaches solid back-to-basic
spelling skills.

 

Crafts for Kids

 

 

Handwriting Without Tears My Printing Book - Grade 1

Handwriting Without Tears My
Printing Book - Grade 1


With this occupational-therapist-designed
program, children with visual, perceptual,
fine-motor and other processing problems
learn to write neatly and legibly.

 

Get Set for School, My First School Book (Handwriting Without Tears)

Coloring. Counting. Writing.
Drawing. School Readiness.

 

Handwriting Without Tears Slate Chalkboard

Handwriting Without Tears Slate
Chalkboard - 4 x 6 Inches

 

Handwriting Without Tears - Wood Pieces Set for Capital Letters

Handwriting Without Tears -
Wood Pieces Set for Capital Letters
-

The Wood Pieces Set and activities help
children develop fine motor, social,
vocabulary and letter formation skills.
Fun Wood Piece activities teach basic
size, shape, and position concepts.

 

Bible Crafts For Sunday School
and Home School

Bible Crafts for Sunday School

 

Lion Bible Craft for Sunday School lesson Daniel inthe Lion's Dan

Free Scaredy Cat
Daniel in the Lion's Den

 

Watchdog Bible Activity Sheet for Sunday School

Free Watchdogs
Sunday School Lesson

 

Free Sunday School Bible Lesson - God Knows Me - Psalm 139

Free "God Knows Me"
Psalm 139
Free Bible Lesson

 

Free Bible Lesson for Sunday School - Psalm 23

Free The Lost Sheep
Sunday School Lesson

 

The Ten Lepers Bible Puppet Craft for Sunday School

Free Don't Forget to
Say Thank You
The Story of the Ten Lepers

 

Free Elijah and the Ravens Bible Lesson for Sunday School
Free Elijah and the Ravens
Sunday School Lesson

 

Bug Buddies Study Christian Home School Lessons

Bug Buddies Study for
Home School

 

Printable Postcards for Sunday School

Printable Postcards for Sunday School

 

Making Learning Fun through Crafts and Activities

 

Christian Wallpaper for your computer

Christian Wallpaper
for your Computer Desktop

 

Get Ready for the Code - Book a

Get Ready for the Code - Book A

For very beginning readers.

 

Explode the Code 1

Explode the Code 1

These workbooks are great for
teaching children to read. They are
easy to use and effective.

 

Learning Fun with Crafts
and Activities

Crafts for Kids from www.daniellesplace.com

 

Spelling Power

Spelling Power

This famous, award-winning spelling
program teaches solid back-to-basic
spelling skills.

 

Crafts for Kids

 

Bible Crafts For Sunday Schol
and Home School

Handwriting Without Tears My Printing Book - Grade 1

Handwriting Without Tears My
Printing Book - Grade 1


With this occupational-therapist-designed
program, children with visual, perceptual,
fine-motor and other processing problems
learn to write neatly and legibly.

 

Get Set for School, My First School Book (Handwriting Without Tears)

Coloring. Counting. Writing.
Drawing. School Readiness.

 

Handwriting Without Tears Slate Chalkboard - 4 x 6 Inches

Handwriting Without Tears Slate
Chalkboard - 4 x 6 Inches

 

Handwriting Without Tears - Wood Pieces Set for Capital Letters

Handwriting Without Tears - Wood
Pieces Set for Capital Letters

The Wood Pieces Set and activities help
children develop fine motor, social,
vocabulary and letter formation skills.
Fun Wood Piece activities teach basic
size, shape, and position concepts.

 

Bible Crafts For Sunday School
and Home School

Bible Crafts for Sunday School

 

Lion Bible Craft for Sunday School lesson Daniel inthe Lion's Dan

Free Scaredy Cat
Daniel in the Lion's Den

 

Watchdog Bible Activity Sheet for Sunday School

Free Watchdogs
Sunday School Lesson

 

Free Sunday School Bible Lesson - God Knows Me - Psalm 139

Free "God Knows Me"
Psalm 139
Free Bible Lesson

 

Free Bible Lesson for Sunday School - Psalm 23

Free The Lost Sheep
Sunday School Lesson

 

The Ten Lepers Bible Puppet Craft for Sunday School

Free Don't Forget to Say Thank
You
The Story of the Ten Lepers

 

Free Elijah and the Ravens Bible Lesson for Sunday School
Free Elijah and the Ravens
Sunday School Lesson

 

Word Nerds: Teaching All Students to
Learn and Love Vocabulary

 

Bug Buddies Study Christian Home School Lessons

Bug Buddies Study for Home School

 

Printable Postcards for Sunday School

Printable Postcards for Sunday School

 

Making Learning Fun through Crafts and Activities

 

Christian Wallpaper for your computer

Christian Wallpaper
for your Computer Desktop

 

Learning Fun with Crafts
and Activities

Crafts for Kids from www.daniellesplace.com